Unhindered Leadership

Unhindered.

That’s the last word in the book of Acts, Luke’s account of the Holy Spirit’s leadership in spreading the gospel from Jerusalem, to Judea and Samaria, to the remotest parts of the earth. Acts 28:30-31 records: And [Paul] stayed two full years in his own rented quarters and was welcoming all who came to him, preaching the kingdom of God and teaching concerning the Lord Jesus Christ with all openness, unhindered.

I’ve been meditating on these two verses for the past month. Can you imagine Paul, one of history’s greatest pioneers, locked down under house arrest in his final days of ministry, chained to a Roman guard (and paying for the privilege), welcoming anyone who comes to visit with his arms and heart open wide? I would be tempted to find those circumstances bleak. But God uses the terms “open” and “unhindered.”

Lesson: Your leadership doesn’t have to be hindered by circumstances or other people’s actions that are beyond your control.

In my own leadership journey I’ve often been hindered, and observed other leaders getting stuck, by some of the following:

  • a poor attitude
  • constant cynicism, criticalness, selfishness, self-pity
  • inability to forgive and release people from past mistakes
  • getting continually (and willingly) sucked into other people’s smaller problems that I cannot solve
  • shifting blame for missed deadlines or underperformance rather than accepting personal responsibility
  • “every day is a crisis” mindset
  • inability to have brief, crucial conversations with colleagues in real time as conflicts arise

By faith, I seek to live freely. Open. Unhindered.

How have you experienced hindered or unhindered leadership?

By Ken

Dr. Ken Cochrum (DMin, Bethel University) is Vice President of Global Digital Strategies at Cru (formerly Campus Crusade for Christ) in Orlando, Florida. An avid cyclist and aspiring guitarist, he also holds a degree in Mechanical Engineering from The University of Texas and a Masters of Arts in Biblical Studies from Dallas Theological Seminary. He recently co-founded Indigitous.org, a movement passionate about connecting people to Jesus using digital strategies. He previously served as vice president of Cru’s student-led movements worldwide. He and his wife Ann spent 13 years in East Asia where they raised their two children. Ken blogs regularly at www.onleadingwell.com.

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